Roast vegetable tortilla recipe with a green olive twist

Our third meal from the Sainsbury’s Homemade by You website is this vegetable tortilla (or maybe frittata?). It’s another vegetable loaded meal with plenty of health, plus low fat protein in the form of many many eggs.

It’s really easy too – we’re basically cooking the vegetables and then pouring an eggy mixture over it. Then it cooks in the pan, before being finished off under the grill.

Lots of food. Lots of taste. The twist on this occasion is green olives which were nice but did seem a little out of place… we love olives enough not to complain though.

Tuna and Vegetable Pasta Bake with Greek Yoghurt

Continuing the theme of “Little Twists” from the Sainsbury’s Homemade By You website, we’ve given it another go with this vegetable loaded pasta bake with Greek yoghurt.

It’s also a great way to get your five a day – there are a lot of vegetables in this, to which you add chopped tomatoes, greek yoghurt, herbs and tinned tuna. The whole thing goes in the oven with a topping of cheese so that it goes nice and brown on top.

The end result was a great big bowl of very satisfying food. There’s nothing too exciting here – it’s basically just a pasta bake with tuna, but the combination of lots of vegetables, cheese and tuna makes for something very tasty and satisfying. The addition of yoghurt makes for something a bit creamier and richer, but to be honest I don’t think that it really added all that much – it would have been a great meal even without it.

Chicken and Broccoli Stir Fry with Coconut

The next few recipes we cooked came from the Sainsbury’s Homemade by You website. Sainsbury’s have been running a campaign called “Little Twists”, encouraging people to be a little bit more adventurous with their cooking, and this recipe is part of that.

It’s a pretty simple dish and quick to make – it’s a chicken and vegetable stir fry like any other, but the different comes at the end when you toss some toasted desiccated coconut into the dish. It’s a simple thing, but it does add a nice bit of flavour and an interesting texture too. I liked it, and so did Mark.

Lemon and Thyme Bundt Cake

We keep going back to bundt cakes ever sine we got a tin and this week is no exception. Fortunately Simply Nigella contains quite a number of these, and we seem to be working our way through them with this lemon and thyme bundt cake. If you want to find a copy of this recipe online, you can find it at Chatelaine.

The cake is pretty easy to make – basically bung it all together and stick it in the tin (or at least that’s my recollection!). It rises enormously though – this was by far our biggest bundt do far! We topped it off with some lemon icing (badly) and sugar stars. It looked pretty enough and the slices were huge!

It was a hugely substantial and hugely satisfying cake, but the flavour wasn’t quite as strong as we were expecting. This is possibly because I didn’t put enough thyme it, and possibly also because I forgot to add the juice of one of the lemons (I just added the zest). The result was more like a Madeira cake with a hint of lemon – but that’s certainly no bad thing and we demolished the lot!

Chicken with Garlic, Tarragon and Cream

This meal is from Nigel Slater’s Appetite, the book which gives you lots of ideas for recipes rather than spelling lots of them out in detail. The book contains a sections on chicken and meat, and that’s where the inspiration for this comes from.

The basic idea is fairly easy – it’s some skin-on bone-on chicken thighs slow cooked in butter. This has the benefit of giving them a really nice and crispy texture, but following the advice on the following pages the burnt on bits of flavour in the pan can be turned into a creamy tarragon sauce to accompany things.

Unfortunately for me, something went wrong – maybe I overcooked the sauce; maybe I used too much vermouth; maybe there were too many burnt on bits… but it ended up coming out quite bitter. To top things off, I’d decided to serve this with polenta but mistakenly grabbed a bag of fine, rather than course, polenta – resulting in something resembling cheesy (we always add parmesan to polenta) wallpaper paste. Not the most appetising thing!

To be fair, it didn’t taste awful… it just wasn’t quite what I’d been hoping for.

Tagliata for Two

We’re revisiting a classic tonight, Nigella’s Italian themed Nigellissima – it’s the book which first got me into cooking properly and not just buying quiche and frozen pizza from the supermarket every week! This dinner is actually composed of two recipes from that book, but tagliata for two is the “main event”.

The meal is pretty straightforward to make. You oil some steak and then fry it, then transfer to a marinade of olive oil, red wine vinegar, chilli flakes and oregano. Then you remove the steak and thinly slice it, and put some chopped cherry tomatoes (I accidentally used plum) in the marinade and serve it up.

For a bit of something extra on the side, I also used Nigella’s recipe for mushrooms in garlic – nice and easy and a bit of extra vegetable on the side.

The resulting meal was nice but nothing to write home about. Trying to combine all the various elements, time got a little bit away from me and I ended up serving a fairly cold dish. Mostly my fault, but it didn’t help the end result. Nothing wrong here, just nothing all that exciting.

The Ultimate Fish Finger Sandwiches

Growing up in the north west of England, I didn’t realise how unique Booths is. For those who don’t know, it’s a chain of supermarkets but they don’t spread much outside of Lancashire – they have a couple of outposts in Cheshire but that’s as far south as they go, and they go no further north than the Lake District.

But Booths is amazing… it’s a high quality supermarket with an emphasis on locally produced food. Think Waitrose (or Whole Foods for the Americans) but with a local twist. Regrettably we’re not close to any of their stores (there is only one in Manchester and it’s quite a way from us), but that doesn’t stop us looking at the recipes on their website and we decided to give this one for “the ultimate fish finger sandwiches” a go.

It’s incredibly easy to put this together. Cut some white fish into pieces and dip them in flour, followed by beaten egg, and finally a mixture of breadcrumbs made from bread, parsley and lemon zest. Fry them in a pan and then serve up on sandwiches assembled from thick cut white bread (buttered, obviously) with some watercress and sliced radish. Tartare sauce is optional, except in our house where it’s mandatory.

Not only did this look good, it tasted great too. Proper comfort food, but without the usual level of guilt!

Pork Bolognese

Looking for a slightly different source of recipes this week, I wound up on the Waitrose website and found this recipe for pork bolognese. Apart from the pork mince, we had everything in the cupboard already so it seemed like an easy option.

An in truth, it is. Chop the onion and carrot and fry them with the pork mince. Once cooked, add the chopped tomatoes, then refill the container with water and add that too. Also add a couple of tablespoons of tomato puree, some oregano and a chicken stock cube. Then you can leave the whole thing to simmer for 15 – 20 minutes and get on and cook some pasta.

The recipe says this is for two people, but I think that may be a typo and it’s actually for four. It calls for 500g of pork mince, which seems a lot, but also for 500g of pasta which makes for a monster of a meal. I actually dialled the pasta back to just 200g and it was still a really substantial meal.

Taste wise? It was OK. Not terrible, not bad, but not spectacular.

Vietnamese Chicken and Sweet Potato Curry

When we have a roast chicken, we tend not to post the photos on Instagram or on here because it’s a pretty routine exercise. However, it is also an opportunity to cook something the next day from Diana Henry’s fabulous A Bird in The Hand which has a whole chapter on uses for leftover chicken. That is, of course, if the chicken survives long enough with Mark and me both pinching bits every time we open the fridge!

The recipe is pretty simple and easy. Fry the chopped onion, then add the chopped chilli and spices (ground coriander and turmeric, the latter of which I forgot to photograph) and fry for a minute. Then add the coconut cream, chicken stock and cubed sweet potato and simmer for about 15 minutes or until the sweet potato is cooked through. Then throw in your chicken and warm it through, along with a squeeze of lime juice, and serve with some rice.

Diana also adds fish sauce, but I left this out because Mark isn’t a fan. This would probably normally be a sweet and sour flavour as a result, but ours was more on the sweet side. Still delicious though!

Chicken and Tuscan Beans

I’ve never watched an episode of Lorraine in my life, but I knew that John Whaite had a cooking slot on her show. That led to me to an explore of the Lorraine website, where I found this recipe of John’s for chicken and Tuscan beans.

The ingredient list isn’t quite as short as you’d find in his Perfect Plates in 5 Ingredients, but it’s not much longer. Fry the chicken thighs and some pancetta (we used smoked streaky bacon) in a wide casserole dish, then put to one side. In the same pan, now fry the onions, tomatoes and garlic before adding white wine (we used vermouth) and reducing. Finally add your tomato puree, rosemary, parsley, seasoning, cannellini beans and chicken stock then bring to the boil. You now put the chicken and bacon back on top and put the whole thing, uncovered, in the oven for 40 minutes.

Very easy, and only one dish to wash up afterwards!